Home » Culture and Society in the Caribbean: Week 4

Culture and Society in the Caribbean: Week 4

Another fascinating class with Lambros Comitas.  When we arrived he was telling us about how his offices had flooded the previous day.  Most of the damage had been cleaned up already, but it had brought to his attention a large collection of documents from M.G. Smith that he hadn’t thought of for around 30 years.

A funny thing happened...
A funny thing happened…

This class, while taking notes, I kept scribbling timings in the left hand column that tracks roughly with the overall audio.  Sometimes I am trying to write what I think I am hearing, other times I am writing questions of my own that come up or making connections of my own generally.  They can also serve to guide the listener visually through the hour and a half of audio.

 

Rediscovered M.G. Smith Ethnomusicology collection
Rediscovered M.G. Smith Ethnomusicology collection
Ethnomusicology tapes listed
Ethnomusicology tapes listed

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Correspondence from M.G. archives
Correspondence from M.G. archives
Letter from M.G. Smith
Letter from M.G. Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Texts referenced in this week's talk
Texts referenced in this week’s talk
Suggested reading for Abram
Suggested reading for Abram

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One comment

  1. One of the comments in my notes (at the bottom of my third notes page), that Comitas was unable to answer for me, was this question of Hills people in general and the maroons of Jamaica in particular being able to fight for their independence without being a formal state. I thought it would be a widely known argument that he could direct me to, but instead I’ve gone back to a Crash Course World History video that I saw last year where I first heard this argument.

    https://youtu.be/wyzi9GNZFMU?t=346

    James C. Scott wrote a book “The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia” in 2009 in which he makes a broad contrary argument to the popular narrative of States and Civilization. He suggests that people of the Hills are actually refugees from nation states, that they are not ‘pre-civilized’ but are actively ‘opting out’ of civilization.

    Here’s a response/review of the book itself (which is 424 pages long!):
    http://www.history.ac.uk/reviews/review/903

    I’m looking forward to presenting this text to Professor Comitas to get his opinion and insights on it.

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